ORPHIC FRAGMENT 71 - OTTO KERN

ORPHIC FRAGMENT 71 - OTTO KERN

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For links to many more fragments: The Orphic Fragments of Otto Kern.

SUMMARY: (The egg from which Phánîs [Φάνης] emerged) moved in an untiring circle.

71. (54. 55) σχόλιον Πρόκλου επὶ Τιμαίου Πλάτωνος 33 b (II 70, 3 Diehl):

τῶι δὲ δημιουργῶι συγγενὲς τὸ σφαιρικόν, ὡς καὶ αὐτῶι νοερῶς ἐν αὐτῶι τὰ πάντα περιέχοντι. τῶι δὲ παραδείγματι. διότι πρώτως ἀπ’ εκείνου πρόεισι. προγονικὸν οὖν τὸ σχῆμα τοῦτό ἐστι τῶι κόσμωι φανὲν µὲν καὶ ἐν αὐτῶι τῶι κρυφίωι διακόσµωι (v. Kroll De orac. Chald. 18 n. 2)· τὸ γὰρ

a <τὸ δ’ add. Proc. σχόλιον Πρόκλου επὶ Κρατύλου Πλάτωνος> ἀτειρέσιον κατὰ κύκλον ἀτρύτως ἐφορεῖτο

κατ’ ἐκείνην εἴρηται τὴν τάξιν· ἐναργέστερον δὲ ὀφθὲν καὶ ἐν τῶι παντελεῖ ζώιωι· τὸ γὰρ

b ὡρμήθη δ’ ἀνὰ κύκλον ἀθέσφατον

περὶ ταύτης εἴρηται τῶι θεολόγωι τῆς θεότητος· ἔστι δὲ μᾶλλον ἐν τοῖς νοεροῖς θεοῖς.

“But a spherical figure is allied to the Demiurgus, because he contains all things intellectually in himself. And it is allied to the paradigm, because it first proceeds from it. Hence this figure, is primogenial to the world. It also presents itself to the view, in the occult order itself. For [what is said in the Orphic verse]

a ‘Unwearied in a boundless orb it moves,’

“is asserted of that order. But it is more clearly seen in all-perfect animal. For it is said of this divinity by the theologist,

b ‘that he is excited in an ineffable circle.’

“And it is still more clearly visible in the [intelligible and at the same time] intellectual Gods.”

(trans. Thomas Taylor, 1820)

Herm. XXXIII; Lob. I 475; Holwerda 306, qui sine veritatis specie versus ad Chaos aut Chaos cum Aethere refert et fingit a 2:

ἀτρύτως ἐφορεῖτο κατὰ σκοτόεσσαν ὁμίχλην (fr. 67).

“bearing constantly untiring things beneath the dark mist.” (trans. by the author)

De ovo Orphico cf. etiam fr. 57 et Ἠθικὰ Πλουτάρχου· 49. Συμποσιακά II 3, 1 p. 635 e:

ἐξ ἐνυπνίου τινὸς ἀπειχόμην ὠιῶν πολὺν ἡδο <. . .> παρὰ τοῦτο ποιούμενος, ἐν καθάπερ ἐν Καρὶ διάπειραν λαβεῖν τῆς ὄψεως ἐναργῶς μοι πολλάκις γενομένης· ὑπόνοιαν μέντοι παρέσχον ἑστιῶντος ἡμᾶς Σοσσίου Σενεκίωνος, ἐνέχεσθαι δόγμασιν Ὀρφικοῖς ἢ Πυθαγορικοῖς, καὶ τὸ ὠιόν, ὥσπερ ἔνιοι καρδίαν καὶ ἐγκέφαλον, ἀρχὴν ἡγούμενος γενέσεως ἀφοσιοῦσθαι (cf. test. nr. 214 et infra s. ΚΑΘΑΡΜΟΙ).

“WHEN upon a dream I had forborne (abstained from) eggs a long time, on purpose that in an egg (as in a Carian) I might make experiment of a notable vision that often troubled me; some at Sossius Senecio's table suspected that I was tainted with Orpheus' or Pythagoras's opinions, and refused to eat an egg (as some do the heart and brain) imagining it to be the principle of generation.”

(The text continues: “And Alexander the Epicurean ridiculingly repeated,—

‘To feed on beans and parents' heads

Is equal sin;’

“as if the Pythagoreans covertly meant eggs by the word κύαμοι (beans), deriving it from κύω or κυέω (to conceive), and thought it as unlawful to feed on eggs as on the animals that lay them.”)

(trans. by several scholars. Corrected and revised by William W. Goodwin,1874)

The story of the birth of the Gods: Orphic Rhapsodic Theogony.

We know the various qualities and characteristics of the Gods based on metaphorical stories: Mythology.

Dictionary of terms related to ancient Greek mythology: Glossary of Hellenic Mythology.

Introduction to the Thæí (the Gods): The Nature of the Gods.

How do we know there are Gods? Experiencing Gods.

The logo to the left is the principal symbol of this website. It is called the CESS logo, i.e. the Children of the Earth and the Starry Sky. The Pætilía (Petelia, Πετηλία) and other golden tablets having this phrase are the inspiration for the symbol. The image represents this idea: Earth (divisible substance) and the Sky (continuous substance) are the two kozmogonic substances. The twelve stars represent the Natural Laws, the dominions of the Olympian Gods. In front of these symbols is the seven-stringed kithára (cithara, κιθάρα), the the lyre of Apóllôn (Apollo, Ἀπόλλων). It (here) represents the bond between Gods and mortals and is representative that we are the children of Orphéfs (Orpheus, Ὀρφεύς).

PLEASE NOTE: Throughout the pages of this website, you will find fascinating stories about our Gods. These narratives are known as mythology, the traditional stories of the Gods and Heroes. While these tales are great mystical vehicles containing transcendent truth, they are symbolic and should not be taken literally. A literal reading will frequently yield an erroneous result. The meaning of the myths is concealed in code. To understand them requires a key. For instance, when a God kills someone, this usually means a transformation of the soul to a higher level. Similarly, sexual union with a God is a transformation.

We know the various qualities and characteristics of the Gods based on metaphorical stories: Mythology.

Dictionary of terms related to ancient Greek mythology: Glossary of Hellenic Mythology.

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