ORPHIC FRAGMENT 158 - OTTO KERN

ORPHIC FRAGMENT 158 - OTTO KERN

HellenicGods.org

HOME GLOSSARY RESOURCE ART LOGOS CONTACT

For links to many more fragments: The Orphic Fragments of Otto Kern.

SUMMARY: This fragment consists of several quotations stating that Justice (Δίκη) sits firmly at the side of Zefs (Ζεύς).

158. (125) σχόλιον Πρόκλου επὶ Πολιτείας Πλάτωνος II 144, 29 Kr:

διὸ καὶ τῶι Διὶ τοῖς Τιτᾶσιν τὰς ἐγκοσμίους | 145 Kr. διανέμειν παρασκευαζομένωι λήξεις ἕπεσθαι τὴν Δίκην ὁ Ὀρφεύς φησιν·

τῶι δὲ Δίκη πολύποινος ἐφέσπετο πᾶσιν ἀρωγός.

εἰ γὰρ πᾶσιν ἀρωγὸς πολύποινος, εἰ τῶι δημιουργῶι τοῦ παντὸς συνδιακοσμεῖ τὰ πάντα, θεῶν ἄρχει (v. fr. 103), δαίμοσιν συνεπιστατεῖ, ψυχὰς διαδικάζει καὶ ἁπαξαπλῶς διὰ πασῶν διεξέρχεται τῶν ψυχῶν ἡ κρίσις.

“Wherefore also, by means of Zefs (Ζεύς) and the Titans, distributing the mundane things by preparing measures to heed Justice, as Orphéfs (Ὀρφεύς) says:

‘And punitive Justice accompanied him, a defender to all.’

“For if to all (he is both) propitious (and) punitive, and if by being the Dîmiourgós of all, he sets all in order. Then therefore, he is first among the Gods; he jointly supervises them by means of daimonæs (δαίμονες). He gives the souls judgement and, altogether, by means of all these things, judgement of the souls is delivered completely.”

(trans. by the author)

et Περὶ τῆς κατὰ Πλάτωνα θεολογίας Πρόκλου VI 8 p. 363, 15 praemissis:

ὁ δὲ Ὀρφεὺς καὶ διαρρήδην εἰς τὸν ὅλον ἀναπέμπει δημιουργόν. ἤδη γὰρ αὐτῶι βασιλεύοντι καὶ διακοσμεῖν ἀρχομένωι τὸ πᾶν, ἕπεσθαι φησι τὴν ὅλην Δίκην. τῶι --- ἐφέσπετο.

“...; but Orpheus clearly refers them to the whole demiurgus. For he says that total Justice follows him, now reigning over, and beginning to arrange and adorn the universe.” (trans. Thomas Taylor, 1816)

etiam σχόλιον Πρόκλου επὶ Τιμαίου Πλάτωνος 41 c (III 232, 31 Diehl):

(Kern does not provide the Greek text)

“For Justice is, as Orpheus says, the companion of Jupiter (Ζεύς); since, according to him,

‘Laborious Justice follows Jove (Ζεύς) . . . . ’ ”

(trans. Thomas Taylor, 1820)

Vide etiam frr. 159. 160.

Parmenid. fr. 1 vs. 14 (Diels II3 149, 7):

τῶν δὲ Δίκη πολύποινος ἔχει κληῖδας ἀμοιβούς*.

“But of these, punitive Justice possesses the alternating keys*” (trans. by the author)

* κληῖδας ἀμοιβούς, a hypallage.

Ἐννεάδες Πλωτίνου V 8, 4 (II 236, 24 Volkm.):

καὶ ἡ οὐσία αὐτὴ σοφία, ἀλλ’ οὐκ αὐτός, εἶτα σοφός, διὰ τοῦτο δὲ οὐδεμία μείζων, καὶ ἡ αὐτοεπιστήμη ἐνταῦθα πάρεδρος τῶι νῶι τῶι συμπροφαίνεσθαι, οἷον λέγουσι κατὰ μίμησιν καὶ τῶι Διὶ τὴν Δίκην.

“Its substance itself is wisdom; but not (existing) so at first, and then later becoming wise. Because of this, there is no greater (wisdom). And abstract knowledge sits here alongside intellect, shining together, such as, they say, by the representation of Zefs (Ζεύς) sitting beside Justice.” (trans. by the author)

H. F. Mueller Herm. LII 1917, 151. Οἰδίπους ἐπὶ Κολωνῷ Σοφοκλέους vs. 1381:

εἴπερ ἐστὶν ἡ παλαίφατος

Δίκη ξύνεδρος Ζηνὸς ἀρχαίοις νόμοις.

“...if indeed Justice, revealed long ago, sits beside Zeus, to share his throne through sanction of primordial laws.” (trans. Sir Richard Jebb, 1889.)

The story of the birth of the Gods: Orphic Rhapsodic Theogony.

We know the various qualities and characteristics of the Gods based on metaphorical stories: Mythology.

Dictionary of terms related to ancient Greek mythology: Glossary of Hellenic Mythology.

Introduction to the Thæí (the Gods): The Nature of the Gods.

How do we know there are Gods? Experiencing Gods.

The logo to the left is the principal symbol of this website. It is called the CESS logo, i.e. the Children of the Earth and the Starry Sky. The Pætilía (Petelia, Πετηλία) and other golden tablets having this phrase are the inspiration for the symbol. The image represents this idea: Earth (divisible substance) and the Sky (continuous substance) are the two kozmogonic substances. The twelve stars represent the Natural Laws, the dominions of the Olympian Gods. In front of these symbols is the seven-stringed kithára (cithara, κιθάρα), the the lyre of Apóllôn (Apollo, Ἀπόλλων). It (here) represents the bond between Gods and mortals and is representative that we are the children of Orphéfs (Orpheus, Ὀρφεύς).

PLEASE NOTE: Throughout the pages of this website, you will find fascinating stories about our Gods. These narratives are known as mythology, the traditional stories of the Gods and Heroes. While these tales are great mystical vehicles containing transcendent truth, they are symbolic and should not be taken literally. A literal reading will frequently yield an erroneous result. The meaning of the myths is concealed in code. To understand them requires a key. For instance, when a God kills someone, this usually means a transformation of the soul to a higher level. Similarly, sexual union with a God is a transformation.

We know the various qualities and characteristics of the Gods based on metaphorical stories: Mythology.

Dictionary of terms related to ancient Greek mythology: Glossary of Hellenic Mythology.

SPELLING: HellenicGods.org uses the Reuchlinian method of pronouncing ancient Greek, the system preferred by scholars from Greece itself. An approach was developed to enable the student to easily approximate the Greek words. Consequently, the way we spell words is unique, as this method of transliteration is exclusive to this website. For more information, visit these three pages:

Pronunciation of Ancient Greek

Transliteration of Ancient Greek

Pronouncing the Names of the Gods in Hellenismos

PHOTO COPYRIGHT INFORMATION: The many pages of this website incorporate images, some created by the author, but many obtained from outside sources. To find out more information about these images and why this website can use them, visit this link: Photo Copyright Information

DISCLAIMER: The inclusion of images, quotations, and links from outside sources does not in any way imply agreement (or disagreement), approval (or disapproval) with the views of HellenicGods.org by the external sources from which they were obtained.

Further, the inclusion of images, quotations, and links from outside sources does not in any way imply agreement (or disagreement), approval (or disapproval) by HellenicGods.org of the contents or views of any external sources from which they were obtained.

For more information: Inquire.hellenicgods@gmail.com

For answers to many questions: Hellenismos FAQ

© 2010 by HellenicGods.org. All Rights Reserved.

HOME GLOSSARY RESOURCE ART LOGOS CONTACT

free hit counter
hit counter