ORPHIC FRAGMENT 127 - OTTO KERN

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SUMMARY: The birth of Pándîmos Aphrodítî (Πάνδημος Ἀφροδίτη) from the foam produced when the members of Ouranós (Οὐρανὸς) were cast into the sea.

127. (101) σχόλιον Πρόκλου επὶ Κρατύλου Πλάτωνος 406c (p. 110, 15 Pasqu.):

παράγει οὖν αὐτὴν (sc. Venerem) ὁ Οὐρανὸς ἐκ τοῦ ἀφροῦ τῶν γονίμων ἑαυτοῦ μορίων ῥιφέντων εὶς τὴν θάλασσαν, ὥς φησιν Ὀρφεύς·

μήδεα δ᾿ ἐς πέλαγος πέσεν ὑψόθεν, ἀμφὶ δὲ τοῖσι

λευκὸς ἐπιπλώουσιν ἑλίσσετο πάντοθεν ἀφρός·

ἐν δὲ περιπλομέναις ὥραις Ἐνιαυτὸς ἔτικτεν

παρθένον αἰδοίην, ἥν δὶ παλάμαις ὑπέδεκτο

γεινομένην τὸ πρῶτον ὁμοῦ Ζῆλός τ' Ἀπάτη τε.

Therefore Ouranós (Οὐρανὸς) brings forth from his own fruitful parts which had been cast into the sea, as said by Orphéfs (Ὀρφεύς):

“The genitals fell down from high into the sea,

swirling round about from every side in the bright foam;

then in the circling season, the Year begot

a venerable maiden; and receiving into their hands

so soon as she was born were Zílos (Ζῆλος) and Apátî (Ἀπάτη) together.”

(trans. by the author)


Cf. Θεογονία Ἡσιόδου 188:

μήδεα δ᾽ ὡς τὸ πρῶτον ἀποτμήξας ἀδάμαντι

κάββαλ᾽ ἀπ᾽ ἠπείροιο πολυκλύστῳ ἐνὶ πόντῳ,

ὣς φέρετ᾽ ἂμ πέλαγος πουλὺν χρόνον, ἀμφὶ δὲ λευκὸς

ἀφρὸς ἀπ᾽ ἀθανάτου χροὸς ὤρνυτο: τῷ δ᾽ ἔνι κούρη

ἐθρέφθη κτλ.

And so soon as he had cut off the members with flint

and cast them from the land into the surging sea,

they were swept away over the main a long time: and a white

foam spread around them from the immortal flesh, and in it there grew a maiden.

(trans. H. G. Evelyn-White, 1914)


Ad vs. 3 cf. Εὐχ. πρ. Μους. 18 Ὥρας ἠδ’ Ἐνιαυτόν, σχόλιον Πρόκλου επὶ Τιμαίου Πλάτωνος 37 e (III 40, 31 Diehl):

ἐπεὶ καὶ οὐ τὸν χρόνον μόνον ὡς θεὸν ὑμνήκασιν, ἀλλὰ καὶ ἡμέραν αὐτὴν καὶ νύκτα καὶ μῆνα [θεὸν del. Diehl] καὶ ἐνιαυτόν,

“For they not only celebrate time as a God, but likewise day and night, and month and year, are considered by them as Gods.” (trans. Thomas Taylor, 1820)

σχόλιον Πρόκλου επὶ Τιμαίου Πλάτωνος 39 d (III 89, 29 Diehl):

οὐ μὴν ἀλλὰ καὶ αὐτὸς Πλάτων ἐν Νόμοις [Νόμοι Πλάτωνος X 899 b] κέκραγεν, ὅτι ταῦτα πάντα θεοί εἰσιν, ὧραι καὶ ἐνιαυτοὶ καὶ μῆνες, ὥσπερ καὶ τὰ ἄστρα καὶ ὁ ἥλιος, καὶ οὐδὲν ἡμεῖς καινὸν εἰσάγομεν ἀξιοῦντες πρὸ τῶν ἐμφανῶν νοεῖν τὰς ἀφανεῖς δυνάμεις τούτων.

“Plato likewise in the Laws proclaims that all these are Gods, viz. the Seasons, Years and Months, in the same manner as the Stars and the Sun; and we do not introduce any thing new, by thinking it proper to direct our attention to the invisible powers of these prior to those that are visible.” (trans. Thomas Taylor, 1820)

v. Waser RE2 V 2568. Ad vs. 5 γεινομένην τὸ πρῶτον. Cf. Θεογονία Ἡσιόδου 202 γεινομένηι τὰ πρῶτα. Ζῆλος Θεογονία Ἡσιόδου 384; Ἀπάτη Θεογονία Ἡσιόδου 224.


The story of the birth of the Gods: Orphic Rhapsodic Theogony.We know the various qualities and characteristics of the Gods based on metaphorical stories: Mythology. Dictionary of terms related to ancient Greek mythology: Glossary of Hellenic Mythology.Introduction to the Thæí (the Gods): The Nature of the Gods.How do we know there are Gods? Experiencing Gods.

This logo is the principal symbol of this website. It is called the CESS logo, i.e. the Children of the Earth and the Starry Sky. The Pætilía (Petelia, Πετηλία) and other golden tablets having this phrase are the inspiration for the symbol. The image represents this idea: Earth (divisible substance) and the Sky (continuous substance) are the two kozmogonic substances. The twelve stars represent the Natural Laws, the dominions of the Olympian Gods. In front of these symbols is the seven-stringed kithára (cithara, κιθάρα), the the lyre of Apóllôn (Apollo, Ἀπόλλων). It (here) represents the bond between Gods and mortals and is representative that we are the children of Orphéfs (Orpheus, Ὀρφεύς).

PLEASE NOTE: Throughout the pages of this website, you will find fascinating stories about our Gods. These narratives are known as mythology, the traditional stories of the Gods and Heroes. While these tales are great mystical vehicles containing transcendent truth, they are symbolic and should not be taken literally. A literal reading will frequently yield an erroneous result. The meaning of the myths is concealed in code. To understand them requires a key. For instance, when a God kills someone, this usually means a transformation of the soul to a higher level. Similarly, sexual union with a God is a transformation.

We know the various qualities and characteristics of the Gods based on metaphorical stories: Mythology.

Dictionary of terms related to ancient Greek mythology: Glossary of Hellenic Mythology.

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