ORPHIC FRAGMENT 207 - OTTO KERN

ORPHIC FRAGMENT 21 - OTTO KERN

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For links to many more fragments: The Orphic Fragments of Otto Kern.

SUMMARY: Orphéfs (Ὀρφεύς) calls both Zefs (Ζεύς) and Diónysos (Διόνυσος) young (νέος) Gods.

207. (191) σχόλιον Πρόκλου επὶ Τιμαίου Πλάτωνος 42d (III 310, 30 Diehl)

τὸν γὰρ Διόνυσον οἱ θεολόγοι ταύτηι τῆι προσηγορίαι κεκλήκασιν, ὃ δέ ἐστι πάσης τῆς δευτέρας δημιουργίας μονάς· ὁ γὰρ Ζεὺς βασιλέα (fr. 208) τίθησι αὐτὸν | 311 Diehl ἁπάντων τῶν ἐγκοσμίων θεῶν καὶ πρωτίστας αὐτῶι νέμει τιμάς·

καίπερ ἐόντι νέωι καὶ νηπίωι εἰλαπιναστῆι.

διὰ δὴ τοῦτο καὶ τὸν ῞Ηλιον νέον θεὸν (v. fr. 205) εἰώθασι καλεῖν --- καὶ ‘νέος ἐφ᾽ ἡμέρηι ἥλιοσ’, φησὶν Ἡράκειτος (Diels I3 78 fr. 6) ---, ὡς Διονυσιακῆς μετέχοντα δυνάμεώς.

“For theologists give this appellation to Bacchus (Διόνυσος), who is the monad of all the second fabrication. For Jupiter (Ζεὺς) established him the king of all the mundane Gods, and distributed to him the first honours,

‘Tho’ young the God, and but an infant guest.’

On this account also, theologists are accustomed to call the sun a recent (νέος, young) God, and Heraclitus says that the sun is a diurnal youth, as participating of Dionysiacal power.” (trans. Thomas Taylor, 1820)

Idem in σχόλιον Πρόκλου επὶ Παρμενίδου Πλάτωνος 127 b p. 686, 36 Cous.:

καὶ γὰρ αὐτὸν τὸν Δία καὶ τὸν Διόνυσον παῖδας καὶ νέους ἡ θεολογία καλεῖ· καίπερ ὄντε νέω φησὶν ὁ Ὀρ |687 Cous. φεύς· καὶ ὅλως τὸ νοερὸν παρὰ τὸ νοητὸν καὶ παρὰ τὸ πατρικὸν παραβάλλοντες οὕτω καλοῦσιν. De Procli fraude v. Kern Orpheus 56 n. 3.

“For even the theology calls Zefs (Ζεύς) and Diónysos (Διόνυσος) boys and youths. ‘Albeit you are both young,’ says Orphéfs (Ὀρφεύς). And when compared to the whole intellectual, and intelligible, and the paternal order, they are referred to in this way.” (trans. by the author)

Cf. de Baccho ap. Ioann. Diaon. ad Θεογονία Ἡσιόδου 943 (v. infra s. ΚΡΑΤΗΡ Ο ΜΙΚΡΟΤΕΡΟΣ):

ταυρογενὴς Διόνυσος ἐυφροσύνην πόρε θνητοῖς ἡδίστην πάσηισί τ' ἐπ' εἰλαπίνηισι πάρεστι.

“Bull-born Diónysos offers sweet merriment to all the mortals when present at the solemn feasts.” (trans. by the author)

The story of the birth of the Gods: Orphic Rhapsodic Theogony.

We know the various qualities and characteristics of the Gods based on metaphorical stories: Mythology.

Dictionary of terms related to ancient Greek mythology: Glossary of Hellenic Mythology.

Introduction to the Thæí (the Gods): The Nature of the Gods.

How do we know there are Gods? Experiencing Gods.

The logo to the left is the principal symbol of this website. It is called the CESS logo, i.e. the Children of the Earth and the Starry Sky. The Pætilía (Petelia, Πετηλία) and other golden tablets having this phrase are the inspiration for the symbol. The image represents this idea: Earth (divisible substance) and the Sky (continuous substance) are the two kozmogonic substances. The twelve stars represent the Natural Laws, the dominions of the Olympian Gods. In front of these symbols is the seven-stringed kithára (cithara, κιθάρα), the the lyre of Apóllôn (Apollo, Ἀπόλλων). It (here) represents the bond between Gods and mortals and is representative that we are the children of Orphéfs (Orpheus, Ὀρφεύς).

PLEASE NOTE: Throughout the pages of this website, you will find fascinating stories about our Gods. These narratives are known as mythology, the traditional stories of the Gods and Heroes. While these tales are great mystical vehicles containing transcendent truth, they are symbolic and should not be taken literally. A literal reading will frequently yield an erroneous result. The meaning of the myths is concealed in code. To understand them requires a key. For instance, when a God kills someone, this usually means a transformation of the soul to a higher level. Similarly, sexual union with a God is a transformation.

We know the various qualities and characteristics of the Gods based on metaphorical stories: Mythology.

Dictionary of terms related to ancient Greek mythology: Glossary of Hellenic Mythology.

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Pronunciation of Ancient Greek

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