ORPHIC FRAGMENT 115 - OTTO KERN

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For links to many more fragments: The Orphic Fragments of Otto Kern.

SUMMARY: These fragments are all about Ôkæanós (Ὠκεανός).

115. (220) σχόλιον τοῦ Εὐσταθίου Θεσσαλονίκης περὶ Διονυσίῳ ὁ Περιηγητής 1 (GG II 217, 15):

πάντως γὰρ Ὠκεανὸς ἀψόρροος ὁ εἰς ἑαυτὸν ὀρούων, ἤγουν ἐπανιὼν καὶ εἰς κύκλου σχῆμα περιαγόμενος, καὶ οὕτως ἐναποκλείων ἑαυτῶι τὴν γῆν· καθὰ καὶ Ὀρφεὺς ἐν τῶι περὶ Διὸς καὶ Ἥρας (v. supra p. 141) φησὶ λέγων·

κύκλον δ’ ἀκαμάτου καλλιρρόου Ὠκεανοῖο,

ὃς γαῖαν δίνηισι πέριξ ἔχει ἀμφιελίξας

ὡς τοῦ ὠκεανοῦ περιειληφότος τὴν γῆν.

“For in all ways, refluent Ôkæanós (Ὠκεανός) is rushing into himself, that is to say, returning and going around himself in the shape of a circle, and in this way enclosing earth within himself. And just as Orphéfs (Ὀρφεὺς) declares in this about Zefs (Ζεὺς) and Íra (Ἥρα), saying:

‘And it is the rotation of unresting, beautifully-flowing Ôkæanós,

who holds the earth in his rotation as he revolves all around it.’

“Thus is Earth embraced by Ôkæanós.” (trans. by the author)


σχόλιον Πρόκλου επὶ Τιμαίου Πλάτωνος 40 e (III 178, 16 Diehl):

πανταχοῦ γὰρ διορίζειν <δεῖν add. Diehl> τὰς πρώτας τάξεις ἀπὸ τῶν δευτέρων, οὐκ ἀλόγως καὶ τῶν ποιητῶν Ὠκεανὸν καλούντων τὸν ὁρίζοντα τῆς γῆς.

“For Ocean every where distinguishes first from second orders, in consequence of which poets do not improperly call it the boundary of the earth.” (trans. Thomas Taylor, 1820)

ὕμνος Ὀρφέως 83 Ὠκεανοῦ vs. 3:

ὃς περικυμαίνει γαίης περιτέρμονα κύκλον·

“He (Ὠκεανός) undulates around the surrounding perimeter of the earth.” (trans. by the author)

Οικουμένης περιήγησης τοῦ Διονυσίου ὁ Περιηγητής vs. 27:

πάντη δ’ ἀκᾳμάτου φέρεται ῥόος Ὠκεανοῖο.

“The current of Ôkæanós (Ὠκεανός) he bears in every way without rest.” (trans. by the author)


The story of the birth of the Gods: Orphic Rhapsodic Theogony.We know the various qualities and characteristics of the Gods based on metaphorical stories: Mythology. Dictionary of terms related to ancient Greek mythology: Glossary of Hellenic Mythology.Introduction to the Thæí (the Gods): The Nature of the Gods.How do we know there are Gods? Experiencing Gods.

This logo is the principal symbol of this website. It is called the CESS logo, i.e. the Children of the Earth and the Starry Sky. The Pætilía (Petelia, Πετηλία) and other golden tablets having this phrase are the inspiration for the symbol. The image represents this idea: Earth (divisible substance) and the Sky (continuous substance) are the two kozmogonic substances. The twelve stars represent the Natural Laws, the dominions of the Olympian Gods. In front of these symbols is the seven-stringed kithára (cithara, κιθάρα), the the lyre of Apóllôn (Apollo, Ἀπόλλων). It (here) represents the bond between Gods and mortals and is representative that we are the children of Orphéfs (Orpheus, Ὀρφεύς).

PLEASE NOTE: Throughout the pages of this website, you will find fascinating stories about our Gods. These narratives are known as mythology, the traditional stories of the Gods and Heroes. While these tales are great mystical vehicles containing transcendent truth, they are symbolic and should not be taken literally. A literal reading will frequently yield an erroneous result. The meaning of the myths is concealed in code. To understand them requires a key. For instance, when a God kills someone, this usually means a transformation of the soul to a higher level. Similarly, sexual union with a God is a transformation.

We know the various qualities and characteristics of the Gods based on metaphorical stories: Mythology.

Dictionary of terms related to ancient Greek mythology: Glossary of Hellenic Mythology.

SPELLING: HellenicGods.org uses the Reuchlinian method of pronouncing ancient Greek, the system preferred by scholars from Greece itself. An approach was developed to enable the student to easily approximate the Greek words. Consequently, the way we spell words is unique, as this method of transliteration is exclusive to this website. For more information, visit these three pages:

Pronunciation of Ancient Greek

Transliteration of Ancient Greek

Pronouncing the Names of the Gods in Hellenismos

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