ORPHIC FRAGMENT 21 - OTTO KERN

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For links to many more fragments: The Orphic Fragments of Otto Kern.

SUMMARY: In the Orphic verses, there is Phánîs (Φάνης) and Irikæpaios (Ἠρικεπαῖος). Irikæpaios swallowed all the Gods, but it was different than when Krónos swallowed his sons. 

80. Pseudo-Nonnos Abbas, ad Gregorii Orationem in Iulianum I 141 n. 78 (Migne 36, 1028) ~ Suid. s. Φάνης: 

Περὶ Φάνητος καὶ Ἠρικεπαίου. 

ἐν τοῖς Ὀρφικοῖς ποιήμασιν εἰσηνέχθη τὰ δύο ταῦτα ὀνόματα μετὰ καὶ ἄλλων πολλῶν· ὧν τὸν μὲν Φάνητα εἰσφέρει αἰδοῖον ἔχοντα ὀπίσω περὶ τὴν πυγήν. λέγουσι δὲ αὐτὸν ἔφορον εἶναι τῆς ζωιογόνου δυνάμεως· ὁμοίως δὲ καὶ τὸν Ἠρικαπαῖον λέγουσιν ἑτέρας ἔφορον εἶναι δυνάμεως. περὶ δὲ τοῦ ὁ πάντας καταπίνων θεούς (Or. XXXI 16; Kern De Theogon. 44), οὐ λέγει περὶ τοῦ Ἠρικεπαίου, αλλὰ περὶ τοῦ Κρόνου. λέγεται γὰρ οὗτος, οὓς ἔτεκεν υἱούς, πάλιν καταπιεῖν, καὶ ἐμέσαι οὓς ἤδη κατέπιε. λέγεται λίθον καταπιεῖν ἀντὶ τοῦ Διὸς καὶ τοῦ λίθου κατελθόντος ἐμέσαι πάντας. 

“On Phánîs (Φάνης) and Irikæpaios (Ἠρικεπαῖος)

In the Orphic verses, this pair of names was brought forward along, also, with many others. Indeed, of these he introduces the august Phánîs bearing (a snake) sucking round its tail. They say that this one is the guardian of the generative power. In a similar way also, they say that Irikæpaios is the ruler of another power. But concerning his swallowing all the Gods, he does not say about Irikæpaios what is said of Krónos. For he says that Krónos brought sons into the world, swallowed them back, and vomited the ones he swallowed. He is said to have swallowed down a stone instead of Zefs, and from swallowing down the stone to have vomited all of them up again.” (trans. by the author)


The story of the birth of the Gods: Orphic Rhapsodic Theogony.
We know the various qualities and characteristics of the Gods based on metaphorical stories: Mythology
Dictionary of terms related to ancient Greek mythology: Glossary of Hellenic Mythology.
Introduction to the Thæí (the Gods): The Nature of the Gods.
How do we know there are Gods? Experiencing Gods.


The logo to the left is the principal symbol of this website. It is called the CESS logo, i.e. the Children of the Earth and the Starry Sky. The Pætilía (Petelia, Πετηλία) and other golden tablets having this phrase are the inspiration for the symbol. The image represents this idea: Earth (divisible substance) and the Sky (continuous substance) are the two kozmogonic substances. The twelve stars represent the Natural Laws, the dominions of the Olympian Gods. In front of these symbols is the seven-stringed kithára (cithara, κιθάρα), the the lyre of Apóllôn (Apollo, Ἀπόλλων). It (here) represents the bond between Gods and mortals and is representative that we are the children of Orphéfs (Orpheus, Ὀρφεύς).


PLEASE NOTE: Throughout the pages of this website, you will find fascinating stories about our Gods. These narratives are known as mythology, the traditional stories of the Gods and Heroes. While these tales are great mystical vehicles containing transcendent truth, they are symbolic and should not be taken literally. A literal reading will frequently yield an erroneous result. The meaning of the myths is concealed in code. To understand them requires a key. For instance, when a God kills someone, this usually means a transformation of the soul to a higher level. Similarly, sexual union with a God is a transformation.

We know the various qualities and characteristics of the Gods based on metaphorical stories: Mythology
Dictionary of terms related to ancient Greek mythology: Glossary of Hellenic Mythology.

SPELLING: HellenicGods.org uses the Reuchlinian method of pronouncing ancient Greek, the system preferred by scholars from Greece itself. An approach was developed to enable the student to easily approximate the Greek words. Consequently, the way we spell words is unique, as this method of transliteration is exclusive to this website. For more information, visit these three pages: 

Pronunciation of Ancient Greek             

 

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