ORPHIC FRAGMENT 237 - OTTO KERN

HellenicGods.org

HOME          GLOSSARY           RESOURCE           ART          LOGOS          CONTACT

For links to many more fragments: The Orphic Fragments of Otto Kern.

SUMMARY: In this fragment, Diónysos is said to be called Phánîs (Φάνης), Evvouléfs (Εὐβουλεύς), Antavyís (Ἀνταυγής), and by many other names. In a second fragment, Diónysos is identified with the Sun. 

237.(167) Macrobii Ambrosii Theodosii Saturnaliorum Libri Septem (Cornelius Labeo?) I 18, 12: 

Orpheus quoque, solem volens intellegi, ait inter cetera

τήκων αἰθέρα δῖον, άκίνητον πρὶν ἐοντα,
ἐξανέφηνε θεοῖσιν ὥραν κάλλιστον ίδέσθαι,
ὃν δὴ νῦν καλέουσι Φάνητά τε καὶ Διόνυσον
Εὐβουλῆά τ’ ἄνακτα καὶ Ἀνταύγην ἀρίδηλον·
ἄλλοι δ’ ἄλλο καλοῦσιν ἐπιχθονίων ἀνθρώπων.
πρῶτος δ’ ἐς φάος ἤλθε, Διώνυσος δ’ ἐπεκλήθη,
οὗνεκα δινεῖται κατ' ἀπείρονα μακρὸν Ὄλυμπον·
ἀλλαχθεὶς δ' ὄνομ' ἔσχε, προσωνυμίας πρὸς ἕκαστον
παντοδαπὰς κατὰ καιρὸν ἀμειβομένοιο χρόνοιο. 

Φάνητα dixit solem ἀπὸ τοῦ φῶτὸς καὶ φανεροῦ id est a lumine atque inluminatione, quia cunctis visitur cuncta conspiciens. Διόνυσος, ut ipse vates ait, ἀπὸ τοῦ δινεῖσθαι καὶ περιφέρεσθαι, id est quod circumferatur in ambitum.

 

Orphéfs (Ὀρφεύς) also, wishing (the association to the) sun to be understood, asserts as much, and other things besides:

‘Dissolving the divine aithír (αἰθήρ), until now unmoved,
he revealed to the Gods, having seen the beautiful offering,
the very one they are now calling Phánîs (Φάνης), and Diónysos,
Evvouléfs (Εὐβουλεύς) the lord, and bright Antavyís (Ἀνταυγής);
some of the men of earth calling him by yet other names.
First he came into light, and they invoked him as Diónysos,
wherefore he whirls down from boundless high Ólymbos (Ὄλυμπος).
He possessed names from other places, epithets proceeding from each,
of every kind upon each proper season through the changing course of time.’ 

“Phánîs is said to be the sun from φάος (light) and φανερός (shining), for he is light as well as illumination, because seeing all he is seen by all. Diónysos, just as the poet says, ‘from spinning and rotating,’ is encircling and purifying.” (trans. by the author) 

Θεοσοφία Αριστόκριτου 8 p. 96, 15 Bur. (v. etiam Bur. p. 54): 

ὅτι τινὲς ἐδόξασαν, τὸν Ἀπόλλωνα εἶναι καὶ Ἥλιον. Αιγύπτιοι δὲ τὸν Ὄσιριν Ἥλιον ὠνόμασαν. μεθερμηνεύεται δὲ Ἑλληνικῆι διαλέκτωι Ὄσιρις ὁ πολυ<ό>φθαλμος ἀπὸ τοῦ πάντηι ἐπιβάλλοντα τὸν ἥλιον τὰς ἀκτῖνας ὥσπερ ὀφθαλμοῖς πολλοῖς πάσαν βλέπειν τὴν γῆν. τινὲς δὲ τῶν Ἑλλήνων καὶ Σίριον αὐτὸν παρωνύμως ὠνόμασαν, ἕτεροι δὲ Διόνυσον, ὡς καὶ Ὀρφεύς· τοὔνεκα . . . Διόνυσον. Vide infra s. ΙΕΡΟΣ ΛΟΓΟΣ [ΑΙΓΥΠΤΙΟΣ]. 

“They conjecture that Apóllôn (Ἀπόλλων) is the Sun. But the Egyptians called Osiris the Sun. Translating with the Greek language (the name of) many-eyed Osiris, (one can) see altogether the sun rays as his many eyes all looking upon the earth. But anyone of Greek and Syrian (?) (heritage) called (the Sun) by the name Diónysos; and thus, for instance Orphéfs (Ὀρφεύς) (says): therefore (his name is) . . .  Diónysos.” (trans. by the author)


The story of the birth of the Gods: Orphic Rhapsodic Theogony.
We know the various qualities and characteristics of the Gods based on metaphorical stories: Mythology
Dictionary of terms related to ancient Greek mythology: Glossary of Hellenic Mythology.
Introduction to the Thæí (the Gods): The Nature of the Gods.
How do we know there are Gods? Experiencing Gods.


The logo to the left is the principal symbol of this website. It is called the CESS logo, i.e. the Children of the Earth and the Starry Sky. The Pætilía (Petelia, Πετηλία) and other golden tablets having this phrase are the inspiration for the symbol. The image represents this idea: Earth (divisible substance) and the Sky (continuous substance) are the two kozmogonic substances. The twelve stars represent the Natural Laws, the dominions of the Olympian Gods. In front of these symbols is the seven-stringed kithára (cithara, κιθάρα), the the lyre of Apóllôn (Apollo, Ἀπόλλων). It (here) represents the bond between Gods and mortals and is representative that we are the children of Orphéfs (Orpheus, Ὀρφεύς).


PLEASE NOTE: Throughout the pages of this website, you will find fascinating stories about our Gods. These narratives are known as mythology, the traditional stories of the Gods and Heroes. While these tales are great mystical vehicles containing transcendent truth, they are symbolic and should not be taken literally. A literal reading will frequently yield an erroneous result. The meaning of the myths is concealed in code. To understand them requires a key. For instance, when a God kills someone, this usually means a transformation of the soul to a higher level. Similarly, sexual union with a God is a transformation.

We know the various qualities and characteristics of the Gods based on metaphorical stories: Mythology
Dictionary of terms related to ancient Greek mythology: Glossary of Hellenic Mythology.

SPELLING: HellenicGods.org uses the Reuchlinian method of pronouncing ancient Greek, the system preferred by scholars from Greece itself. An approach was developed to enable the student to easily approximate the Greek words. Consequently, the way we spell words is unique, as this method of transliteration is exclusive to this website. For more information, visit these three pages: 

Pronunciation of Ancient Greek             

 

Transliteration of Ancient Greek             

 

PHOTO COPYRIGHT INFORMATION: The many pages of this website incorporate images, some created by the author, but many obtained from outside sources. To find out more information about these images and why this website can use them, visit this link: Photo Copyright Information

DISCLAIMER: The inclusion of images, quotations, and links from outside sources does not in any way imply agreement (or disagreement), approval (or disapproval) with the views of HellenicGods.org by the external sources from which they were obtained.

Further, the inclusion of images, quotations, and links from outside sources does not in any way imply agreement (or disagreement), approval (or disapproval) by HellenicGods.org of the contents or views of any external sources from which they were obtained.

For more information: Inquire.hellenicgods@gmail.com

For answers to many questions: Hellenismos FAQ

© 2010 by HellenicGods.org.  All Rights Reserved.

free hit counterHOME             GLOSSARY            RESOURCE           ART          LOGOS           CONTACT
Web Analytics Made Easy - StatCounter