ORPHIC FRAGMENT 112 - OTTO KERN

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For links to many more fragments: The Orphic Fragments of Otto Kern.

SUMMARY: This is a discussion of marriage between Gods.

112. (91) σχόλιον Πρόκλου επὶ Τιμαίου Πλάτωνος 30e (III 176 10 Diehl):

ἀπὸ δὲ τούτον δευτέρα πρόεισι δυάς, Ὠκεανὸς καὶ Τηθύς, οὐ κατὰ συνδυασμὸν γενεσιουργὸν οὐδὲ κατά τινα σύνοδον τῶν κεχωρισμένων οὐδὲ κατὰ μερισμὸν οὐδὲ κατά τινα ἀποτομὴν τῆς ἀπογεννήσεως ταύτης γενομένης --- πάντα γὰρ ταῦτα ἀλλοτρίως τῶν θεῶν διαδοξάζουσί τινες ---, ἀλλὰ κατὰ μίαν ἕνωσιν καὶ συμπλοκὴν τῶν δυνάμεων ἀδιαίρετον, <ὃν add. Schneid.> καὶ εἰώθασι γάμον οἱ θεολόγοι προσαγορεύειν· οἰκεῖος γὰρ καὶ ὁ γάμος τῆι τάξει ταύτηι, καθά φησιν ὁ θεολόγος· πρώτην γὰρ νύμφην ἀποκαλεῖ τὴν Γῦν καὶ πρώτιστον γάμον τῦν ἕνωσιν αὐτῆς τὴν πρὸς τὸν Οὐρανον· οὐ γὰρ ἐν τοῖς μάλιστα ἡνωμένοις ὁ γάμος, διὸ Φάνητος οὐκ ἔστι γάμος καὶ Νυκτός, ἡνωμένων ἀλλήλοις νοητῶς, ἀλλ' ἐν τοῖς μετα τῦς ἑνώσεως καὶ τὸ διηιρημένον τῶν δυνάμεων καὶ τῶν ἐνεργειῶν ἐπιδεικνυμένοις καὶ ἔοικε διὰ ταῦτα καὶ Οὐρανῶι τούτωι καὶ Γῆι <ταύτηι add. Diehl> προσήκειν ὁ γάμος, ὡς ἐκεῖνον οὐρανὸν καὶ γῆν ἐκείνην ἐνεικονιζομένοις. ὃ δὴ καὶ οἱ θεσμοὶ τῶν Ἀθηναίων εἰδότες προσέταττον Οὐρανῶι καὶ Γῆι προτελεῖν τοὺς γάμους κτλ.

From these however, a second duad proceeds, Ocean (Ὠκεανὸς) and Tethys (Τηθύς), this generation not being effected by copulation, nor by any conjunction of things separated, nor by division, nor according to a certain abscission, for all these are foreign from the Gods; but they are accomplished according to one union and indivisible conjunction of powers. And this union theologists are accustomed to call marriage. For marriage, as the theologist Orpheus says, is appropriate to this order. For he calls Earth (Γαῖα) the first Nymph (woman), and the union of her with Heaven (Οὐρανός) the first marriage; since there is no marriage in the divinities that are in the most eminent degree united. Hence there is no marriage between Phanes and Night who are intelligibly united to each other. And marriage appears on this account to be adapted to the Heaven and Earth which we are at present considering, so far as they adumbrate the intellectual Heaven and Earth; which the sacred laws of the Athenians likewise knowing, ordered that the marriages of Heaven and Earth should be celebrated, as preparatory to initiation into the Mysteries.” (trans. Thomas Taylor, 1820.)

σχόλιον Πρόκλου επὶ Κρατύλου Πλάτωνος 402 b (83, 1 Pasqu.):

ὅτι γαμεῖν λέγεται ὅ τε Ὠκεανὸς τὴν Τηθὺν καὶ Ἥραν ὁ Ζεὺς καὶ τὰ τοιαῦτα, ὡς κατὰ τὴν τῶν ὑφειμένων ἀπογέννησιν τὴν πρὸς αὐτὴν κοινωνίαν ἐνστησάμενος· ἡ γὰρ ὁμονοητικὴ σύνταξις τῶν θεῶν καὶ ἡ ὁμοφυὴς συνέργεια πρὸς τὰς ποιήσεις γάμος ἀποκαλεῖται παρὰ τοῖς θεολόγοις.  Cf. etiam in Tim. 41 d (III 248, 5 Diehl).

Ôkæanós (Ὠκεανός) is said to marry Tîthýs (Τηθύς) and Zefs (Ζεὺς) to wed Íra (Ἥρᾱ), and other pairings similar to this. As is follows, they produce from this yielding, generation, in consideration of setting in place marriage. For the harmonious arrangement of the Gods, and the cooperation of their same natures towards creation, is called marriage by the theologians. (trans. by the author)



The story of the birth of the Gods: Orphic Rhapsodic Theogony.
We know the various qualities and characteristics of the Gods based on metaphorical stories: Mythology
Dictionary of terms related to ancient Greek mythology: Glossary of Hellenic Mythology.
Introduction to the Thæí (the Gods): The Nature of the Gods.
How do we know there are Gods? Experiencing Gods.


The logo to the left is the principal symbol of this website. It is called the CESS logo, i.e. the Children of the Earth and the Starry Sky. The Pætilía (Petelia, Πετηλία) and other golden tablets having this phrase are the inspiration for the symbol. The image represents this idea: Earth (divisible substance) and the Sky (continuous substance) are the two kozmogonic substances. The twelve stars represent the Natural Laws, the dominions of the Olympian Gods. In front of these symbols is the seven-stringed kithára (cithara, κιθάρα), the the lyre of Apóllôn (Apollo, Ἀπόλλων). It (here) represents the bond between Gods and mortals and is representative that we are the children of Orphéfs (Orpheus, Ὀρφεύς).


PLEASE NOTE: Throughout the pages of this website, you will find fascinating stories about our Gods. These narratives are known as mythology, the traditional stories of the Gods and Heroes. While these tales are great mystical vehicles containing transcendent truth, they are symbolic and should not be taken literally. A literal reading will frequently yield an erroneous result. The meaning of the myths is concealed in code. To understand them requires a key. For instance, when a God kills someone, this usually means a transformation of the soul to a higher level. Similarly, sexual union with a God is a transformation.

We know the various qualities and characteristics of the Gods based on metaphorical stories: Mythology
Dictionary of terms related to ancient Greek mythology: Glossary of Hellenic Mythology.

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